Educational Articles

Dogs + Care & Wellness

  • Dogs love to run. Dogs love to jump. Dogs love to swim. If your dog likes to do all three, why not investigate the relatively-new canine sport of Dock Diving?

  • Field trials focus on team-hunting and allow humans and their pet dogs to rekindle their hunting instincts in a fun, competitive format.

  • Treats are a great way to bond with your pet but can be a major contributor to obesity. Treats should be no more than 5-10% of your dog’s caloric intake as they add calories, and in greater quantities, can create a nutritional imbalance. Excellent treats that are low calorie and satisfying are vegetables such as green beans, broccoli, and cauliflower as well as air-popped popcorn. Many homemade treat recipes can be found on the internet, but be sure that these are not too high in calories or contain inappropriate ingredients for your individual dog. Check the recipe with your veterinarian before having your dog taste test them!

  • To enjoy a long walk with your dog there are many things you should consider. Discuss your dog’s exercise plan with your veterinarian to ensure it is not too taxing for him. Have a short 4-6 foot strong leash and properly fitted harness, collar, or headcollar. Review basic obedience commands before heading out so your dog will be more likely to listen if distracted. Dress comfortably yourself, and make sure your pet is comfortable in extreme temperatures with protective boots. Be prepared with pet waste bags in order to clean up after your dog. Carry water for both you and your dog and make sure you both have identification should you become separated or have an accident. Make sure to warm up before and cool down after a more vigorous walk. Check your dog’s paws after a walk for injuries, burs, or insects such as ticks. Their paws can also be wiped with a wet cloth if they have walked on the beach or snowy paths.

  • My dog produces so much gas! It is really a problem when we have guests over. Why does she pass so much gas?

  • Even though e-cigarettes may be safer for humans than using traditional tobacco products, they are certainly not safe for pets. The nicotine associated with e-cigarettes, even without the tobacco, poses a serious health threat for dogs and cats.

  • Eclampsia is hypocalcemia in a dog who has recently given birth. Breeds such as Chihuahuas, Pomeranians, Toy Poodles, Miniature Pinscher, Shih Tzu, and other small breeds are at an increased risk. Eclampsia is considered an emergency and immediate medical attention should be sought. It can quickly progress from weakness to tremors, seizures, or paralysis. Treatment involves immediate intravenous injections of calcium and other drugs. Recovery from eclampsia is usually rapid and complete if treated early.

  • The estrous cycle in dogs on average happens twice a year once a dog reaches sexual maturity. On average a dog will be in heat for 1½ to 2 weeks but this can be shorter or longer. In many cases, a bloody vaginal discharge is the first sign that a pet owner will notice when their dog comes into heat. In some cases, the discharge will not be apparent until several days after heat has begun. There are no valid reasons for letting a dog have a litter of puppies before being spayed. If you want to keep your dog from having any accidental pregnancies, it is best to have her spayed.

  • On average, dogs go into heat about twice a year or every six months, although it varies from dog to dog. The most obvious sign of heat in dogs is vaginal bleeding. The time of mating is extremely critical and it is highly recommended that you have your female tested to determine the optimal days for breeding. This will improve your chance of success. If mismating occurs with your dog, contact your veterinarian to discuss options. Before breeding your dog, it is best to consult with your veterinarian to ensure the female is healthy and also to discuss the risks.

  • Open and honest communication with your veterinarian and veterinary healthcare team throughout a dog's life lays the foundation for effective communication when that dog's life begins to draw to a close. Discussion with your veterinarian will clarify any specific medical implications of your dog's disease that can serve as benchmarks to suggest that euthanasia should be considered. Most often, euthanasia is provided at the veterinary practice or in your home. The veterinary healthcare team will be an important partner as you negotiate the difficult days and decisions leading up to your dog’s death.

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